Newspaper Archive of
The Oskaloosa Independent
Valley Falls , Kansas
Lyft
October 21, 2010     The Oskaloosa Independent
PAGE 8     (8 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 8     (8 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
October 21, 2010
 

Newspaper Archive of The Oskaloosa Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




[,- i d P. 8 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2010 THE OSKALOOSA INDEPENDENT News NEK-CAP Inc. Iow- KDWP awarded new income nominations USDA access grant  requested The Northeast Kansas Commu- nity Action Program is requesting On Oct. 4, agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack announced that Kansas is among 17 states that will receive grants through the Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Pro- gram. The successful applicants were selected from 28 applications vying for the competitive VPA-HIP grants program that was announced July 8. Eligible states and tribal govern- ments could request funding for existing public access programs, to create new public access programs, or to provide incentives to improve wildlife habitat on enrolled lands. The funds can be used to provide rental payments and other incen- tives, such as technical or conser- vation services, to landowners who provide the public access to their land for wildlife-dependant recre- ation. This was the first of three appli- cation periods for the $50 million in VPA-HIP grant funds, which were approved as part of the 2008 Farm Bill. The initial 17 successful ap- plicants will receive grants totaling $11.76 million, of which Kansas was awarded $1.5 million for the first of three funded grant years. Although funding amounts for the second and third years of the approved grant are contingent upon availability, Kansas could receive as much as $2 million in additional funds each year. But be- cause the VPA-HIP grant submitted by KDWP was approved for three years, Kansas will not be required to compete for funding during sub- sequent application periods. FSA plans to open the grant ap- plication period for fiscal year 2011 funding after publication of a final rule. It is anticipated that the next grant application period will occur in the late fall of 2010. The successful grant application, which was submitted by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, will provide a tremendous boost to existing hunting and fishing access programs in the state. "We were very pleased to be one of the first states to receive VPA- HIP funding," said Jake George, KDWP Private Land Programs co- ordinator, who submitted the grant application. "The additional funding provided by this grant will allow further expansion and improvement of the already successful access and habitat management programs of- fered through KDWP." County news and photos at Dependable care plus benefits. Now that's great service. As a patient of a Cotton-O'Neil physician, you recewe quality primary care services. But your care goes well beyond the exam room with these important benefits: • An electronic medical records system that results in the improved care and efficiency of your information • A well-rounded network of sub-specialty physicians to manage chronic illnesses. • A regional medical center offering an Emergency and Level llTrauma Center for unexpected illnesses or accidents. Consider Cotton-O'Neil Clinic for your health care needs. Family Medicine Laurie Conway, M.D. Cotton-O'Neil Clinic 209 W. Jefferson St. (785) 863-3417 Division of Stormont-Vail HealthCare www.stormontvail.org Need help with your health after hours? Call Health Connections at (785) 354-5225. nominations for a low-income rep- resentative to be elected to serve on the agency's Multi-County Board of Directors for Area III, which repre- sents Jackson and Jefferson counties. This representative will be elected for a three-year term, beginning in January. Board membership also includes a representative from the private and public sectors. The purpose of the board is to oversee policy for NEK-CAP Inc. and insure that the programs offered by the agency are in the best interest of the low-income population in the 10-county service area. A nominee must be 18 years of age or older and can be from any income level provided that the person has a sincere interest in representing the low-income population. If a person is interested in becoming a low-income representative and has an income level above 125 percent of federal poverty guidelines, a low-income indi- vidual must nominate them. Persons below the federal poverty guidelines can nominate themselves or can be nominated by another low-income person. Nominations will be accepted from 9 a.m. to noon Oct. 25 at the Jefferson County Outreach Office, located at 204 Warren in Oskaloosa (785-863- 2372) and from 1 to 4 p.m. Oct. 26 at the Jackson County Outreach Office, located at 130 South Iowa in Holton (785-3644055). For additional information regard- ing the nomination process, contact the administrative office at 785- 742-2222 or 888-904-8159 or email nekcap@nekcap.org. After nominations close, the Jack- son County Advisory Committee offi- cers will meet to officially review the nominations for Area III and place on the ballot those qualified to run. The date, time and polling place for the election will be announced in the near future. Only individuals falling below the current low-income guidelines will be eligible to vote. Topeka symphony Entries sought for. State park bargain youth talent audi- annual Kansas Fac tions-application deadline Oct. 23 Applications for the Topeka Sym- phony Youth Talent Auditions must be postmarked by Oct. 23. For more information or to obtain an entry form, visit topekasymphony. org. The Topeka Symphony will hold its 58th annual Youth Talent Auditions Saturday, Nov. 20, at White Concert Hall on the Washburn University campus. Students in grades 9 through 12 are invited to compete for the op- portunity of soloing with the Topeka Symphony Orchestra. Contestants may enter in any of four divisions: vocal; piano; wind and percussion instruments; and string instruments. Entrants may perform one or more movements of any standard work for solo and or- chestra which has a readily available orchestral accompaniment and lasts from a minimum of 7 to a maximum of 15 minutes performance time. Capitol Federal, sponsor of the auditions, will present a scholarship award to the winner in each division. The overall winner of the auditions will perform with the orchestra Jan. 13 and 15. The first runner-up will appear at the March 6 concert fea- turing the Topeka Symphony Youth Orchestra. County news and photos at ihen p',, .o  lhen p v. tual Story Contest Entries are being accepted for the annual Kansas Factual Story Contest during Kansas 150. The annual contest, sponsored by the Native Sons and ,Daughters of Kansas, encourages preserving, in writ- ing, factual, unpublished happenings and anecdotes in the lives of Kansans today and yesterday. Olive Ann Beech, Wichita, provided cash awards for win- ners for over 30 years. Following her death, her daughter, Mary Lynn Oliver, Wichita, has continued this support. Beech Memorial Cash Awards are: first place, $175; second place, $125; third place, $100; and $50 each for two honorable mentions. Entrants are asked to keep copies of their entries; none will be returned. The Kansas Historical Society may preserve all stories. Stories should have taken place in Kansas;be limited to 750 words; be true and not have been published. The contest is open to anyone, anywhere. Only onestory may be submitted per person. Entries must be submitted by e- mail no later than Dec. 1. Send entries to:Vicky Henley, Kansas State Histori- cal Society Inc. via e-mail to: member- ship@kshs.org. In subject area of e-mail include "Beech Memorial Contest." A panel from the Kansas Historical Society will judge entries. Winners will be announced and recognized at the annual meeting of the Native Sons and Daughters of Kansas in Topeka Jan. 28. Winners for 2010 were: first place, Marcia Dumler, Perry; second place, Alvin Lee Daetwiler Jr., Parsons; third place, BettyAnnWilliams, Lamed; and honorable mention, LeNore Stumpf, Axtell. THE OSKALOOSA 00n00icprnbent is available at these fine merchants: Oskaloosa: Independent Office • Oskaloosa Thriftway • Parker's Hallmark & Gifts • Casey's • Metzger's Bear Essentials M’Louth: McLouth Oil Company- Casey's Meriden: Max-Mart Convenience Store • Country Harvest Apple Market. ZZzzz's Convenience Store Nortonville: Country Inn Service Ozawkie: Casey's Perry: Casey's • Fast Trax Valley Falls: Vindicator Office • Steve's Thriftway Winchester: KT's Short Stop Newapem: : ae delivered season now open Kansas is well into autumn, and for many outdoorsmen and women, this is the best time of year to visit a Kansas state park. Hunters and anglers -- and even campers looking for a cool-season adventure -- take advantage of the off-season (Oct. 10-March 31) in Kansas state parks, enjoying cool weather and especially lower off-season prices. Hunters and anglers probably use parks more than other visi- tors during the off-season, and the growing number of cabins in parks makes stays more inviting -- and comfortable. Many cabins provide all the amenities of home and prox- imity to popular outdoor activities. Cabin rental fees vary depending on size, days of the week, and time of year. Standard off-season state park permit fees are as follow: • Daily Vehicle permit -- $3.70 (senior/disabled, $2.60); • Annual Vehicle permit-- $19.70 (senior/disabled, $11.10); • Additional Annual Vehicle permit --$12.20 (senior/disabled, $7.35); • Daily Camping permit :-- $7.50; and • 14-Day Camping permit -- $87.50. Costs listed include applicable ser- vice fees, except an online purchase convenience fee. Annual permits purchased in either the off-season or the prime season are valid for the remainder of the calendar year. 2011 permits go on sale Dec. 15. The Kansas Department of Wild- life and Parks' Parks Division oper- ates a system of 27 parks, including the Prairie Spirit Trail. In addition to cabins, most state parks provide utilities and primitive camping and are located adjacent to lakes or reservoirs. Utility fees remain unchanged although some camping fees are less expensive if purchased in the off-season. In addition to camping facilities, parks offer boat ramps, courtesy docks, shelter houses, trails, and a variety of other amenities. Kansas Humanities Council announces 2011 grant opportunities The Kansas Humanities Council announces grant opportunitie s avail- able to Kansas non-profits in 2011. Of special interest are projects that will help commemorate the 150th anniversary of Kansas statehood and explore what it means to be a Kansan over time and across generations. Kansas Humanities Council grants are designed to connect people with Kansas' ideas, places, and history through museum exhibitions, panel discussions, heritage walking tours, oral history projects, digitization projects, podcasts, short films, and other projects that strengthen our community, encourage humanities discussions, and connect our past with our future. The 2011 grant deadlines are: March 4, June 3, and Oct. 7. Grant guidelines are available at kansashumanities.org. The Kansas Humanities Council conducts and supports community- based programs, serves as a financial resource through an active grant- maMng program, and encourages Kansans to participate in their corn- munities. CHURCH DIRE,,CTORYI Who You00 Neighbor. :) In an era where modern modes of travel allow us to travel halfway around the Your Guide To Local Houses of Worship The Oskaloosa Independent Church Directory lists churches in the communities served by the paper. Oskaloosa Blessed Hope Baptist Church Independent Fundamental Eldon Schuler, Pastor 606 Union St • (785) 863-2039 Sunday School ....................................................... 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship .............................. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Sunday Youth Meeting ...... i ........................................ 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer & Bible Study .............................. 7 p.m. Church of Christ • Willis Cheatham, Preacher 402 Cherokee • (785) 863-2901 Sunday School ....................................................... 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship ................................... 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wednesday Worship .............................................. 7:00 p.m. First Baptist Church (SBC) Paul A. Reed, Pastor Hwy. 59 at Herkimer • (785) 863-2328 Sunday Bible Study .................................................. 10 a.m. Sunday Worship .................................... ..... 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wednesday Home Study Group ................................. 7 p.m. First Presbyterian Church Rev. Jeff Light 105 Jefferson • (785) 863-2773 Sunday Worship ....................................................... 10 a.m. First United Methodist Church Melinda Harwood, Pastor 402 Liberty • Church (785) 863-2592 Sunday Morning Worship ................................... 10:30 a.m. Tuesday Evening Prayer ........................................ 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study ...................................... 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Choir .................................................. 6:45 p.m. Living Water E-Free Church Pastor David Ballast Hwy 92 (l mile west of Oskaloosa) (785) 863-9260 or (785) 863-9230 Sunday School ....................................................... 9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship .................................................. 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Night Bible Study .............................. 7:30 p.m. Nortonville Pleasant Grove Christian Church LeRoy Riley, Minister • (913) 886-3150 Sunday Bible School ............................................. 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship .................................................. 10:30 a.m. Sunday Bible Study ............................................... 5:30 p.m. Sunday Youth Meeting .......................................... 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Choir Practice .................................... 7:30 p.m. Seventh Day Baptist Church Steve Saunders Pastor ° (913) 886-2338 Sabbath Worship (Saturday) ..................................... 10 a.m. Sabbath School (Saturday) .................................. 11:15 a.m. Sabbath Fellowship Lunch .................................. 12:30 p.m. St. Joseph's Church Father John Reynolds, (913) 886-2030 Sunday Mass .............................................................. 8 a.m. Elementary & High School Religious Education ................. ............................. Immediately Following the Sunday Mass St. Matthew Lutheran Church Pastor Michael Van Velzer Lafayette & Elm Streets • (913) 886-6331 Sunday School & Adult Bible Class ........................... 9 a.m. Sunday Worship .................................................. 10:15 a.m. Communion services 2nd and last Sundays United Methodist Church Pastor Nick Marsh ° (913) 886-3470 Sunday Worship ....................................................... 10 a.m. Wesleyan Holiness Alliance Sunday School .......................................................... 10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................................... 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Thursday Prayer Meeting ...................................... 7:30 p.m. Mooney Creek Corpus Christi Catholic Church Father John Reynolds, (913) 886-2030 Mooney Creek Community Saturday Mass ............................................................ 5 p.m. Religious Education Preschool-8-Samrdays ........ 3:45 p.m. Religious Education 9-12-Wednesdays ..................... 7 p.m. McLouth Church of the Nazarene Pastor John Wright Church (913) 796-6290 Parsonage (913) 796-6635 901 E. Lake Street Sunday School ....................................................... 9:15 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ................................... 10:30 a.m. Sunday Night Worship ............................................... 6 p.m. Wednesday Night Ministries ..................................... 7 p.m. Countryside Baptist Church Church (785) 863-2038 10328 Wellman Road Sunday School .......................................................... 10 a.m. Sunday Worship ........................................................ 11 a.m. Evening Worship ........................................................ 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study ............................................. 7 p.m. First Baptist Church The Rev. Scott Berry Sunday School ....................................................... 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship .................................................. 10:45 a.m. Middle School Youth (Sunday) .................................. 6 p.m. High School Youth (Sunday) ...................................... 7 p.m. Stanwood Friends Church Pastor Reggie Phillips ° 740-504-0555 Sunday School .......................  .................................. 10 a.m. Sunday Worship ........................................................ 11 a.m. United Methodist Church The Rev. Morgan Smith Church (913) 796-6589 Sunday Early Worship ........................................... 8:30 a.m. Sunday School ....................................................... 9:45 a.m. Sunday Worship ........................................................ 11 a.m. Pathway to Life Pastors Jill Penrod and Jeff Steudler • Full Gospel 201 E. Lucy • Church (913) 796-9999 Sunday Worship Revival Service ........................ 10:30 a.m. world in a single day, and computers and phones connect us instantly with those on the other side of the planet, our "neighborhood" has expanded considerably. We are living in an era where all of earth's inhabitants are truly our neighbors, that is, people with whom we can interact in a way which can harm or help them. Just as we can easily send money or aid to faraway places, we can just as easily harm them, sometimes unknowingly. Americans who buy drugs smuggled into our country are often supporting violent drug cartels and therefore funding violence. Likewise, the things that we say and do online may hurt or harm people around the world. Cyber bullying has become a problem in many places because people use social networking to ridicule and ostracize others. These days, we may have more direct contact with someone living halfway around the world than we do with the person living next door. Consider how our actions might be helping or harming our neighbors around the world, and next door. We should love our neighbors as ourselves. When asked who our neighbors are, Jesus responded with the parable of the Good Samaritan, the story of a man who risks helping a stranger who had fallen prey to robbers, when a priest and a Levite had passed him by. Which of these three, do you think, proved neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers? He said, "The one who showed mercy on him." And Jesus said to him, "Go and do likewise." R.S.V. Luke 10:36-37 Winchester New Testament Christian Church Vic Peterson, Preacher Study (913) 774-7641 Residence (913) 774-4800 Sunday School ............................................................ 9 a.m. Sunday Worship ....................................................... 10 a.m. Sunday Youth Meeting ............................................... 7 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study ............................................. 7 p.m. Reformed Presbyterian Church The Rev. Paul W. Finley Church (913) 774-4021 Parsonage (913) 774-4585 Sunday Bible Study .................................................. 10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................................... 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Sunday Evening Fellowship ....................................... 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting .................................... 7:30 p.m United Methodist Church The Rev. Nick Marsh Church (913) 774-4111 Sunday Worship ......................................................... 9 a.m. Sunday School .......................................................... 10 a.m. Ozawkie The Way of the Cross United Methodist Church Kansa at Goldenrod Pastor Nicholas Marsh Sunday School (All ages) ................................... 9:30 a.m. God Squad Youth Group ................................... 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship ............................................... 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study ..................................... 6:30 p.m. REALTORS*L4 iHEI BANK O iF i,cT. , ' Barnett- Chapel .Oaks (IF Agency  I1 Gu lmett I /  wr !9132774-4444.097  l'ltt , ' The Oskaloosa Independent [RO. Box325. O:.kllouOOr.TeleKpS66e%6nki(ng8(5)856386223 MEMBERFDIC 8 6 224 IIY IY I Meriden. Oskaloosa. Lawrence 913 9 r C r • Quality Commercial Printing I il i!